Tuesday, May 27, 2008

Wordless Wednesday - 50


Photo by Charles Barclay




A Black wood cutter at Shelburne, Nova Scotia - 1788
National Archives of Canada

15 comments:

Julia Smith said...

I've got a lot of words on my Wordless Wednesday.

Tomorrow I'll be posting a review of Stephen Kimber's 'Loyalists and Layabouts', which follows the experiences of both white United Empire Loyalists and black Loyalists who settled the town of Shelburne, Nova Scotia in the late 1700's. They were fleeing the dangerous climate of post-revolutionary America, where those loyal to the British king were no longer welcome.

SandyCarlson said...

Political refugees. Those were the days! Thanks for the education, Julia!

KathyUSA said...

Neat info!! Thanks!
Having a horable time figuring out the WW pg today. So my name isn't posted yet

Amy Ruttan said...

Hmm sounds interesting. I'm a descendant of United Empire Loyalists in Ontario.

My great, great, great, great grand father Captain Peter Ruttan helped defend Fort York from the Americans in the war. :)

His portrait hangs in Fort York.

Julia Smith said...

Totally cool, Amy!!

ARCHITECT said...

cute

BNS said...

That's very interesting, and it's an aspect of the history of that period that most of us in the U.S. do not know much about.

Happy WW.

Bobbie

Anne MacFarlane said...

I love this period in history. Can`t wait to read what you thought of the book.

the teach said...

Very interesting, Julia! In America we learn very little about the English loyalists as you might expect. I'll be back to read all about it tomorrow. :)

Jim said...

Hey Julia, you are 'teaching' today also (tr: the teach today).
Mrs. Jim and I have Nova Scotia on our travel 'wish list.'

Right now my highest level of Nova Scotia historical fact knowledge is that the name, Nova Scotia, means New Scotland.

Happy WW!
..

Julia Smith said...

Jim - Nova Scotia is a great place to have on your wish list! But bring lots of layers - we get all kinds of weather, depending on the hour of the day. And we're so 'New Scotland' we have our own provincial tartan.

eastcoastlife said...

Interesting. 225 years of history! I want to learn more about Nova Scotia. Will I see your provincial tartan on any of your previous posts? :)

Julia Smith said...

Eastcoastlife - check out the Nova Scotia tartan here.

Wylie Kinson said...

your educational post reminded me how very little I know of Canadian history... sad but true. I seem to know more about British and American (and Bermudian) -- but I must catch up so my kids don't think me an idiot when they start learning this stuff in school.

Brenda ND said...

I like the wood cutter. Cool.